Can we discuss the failure of Newspaper Pay Walls

  wee eddie 13:33 12 Jan 2019

In my surfing, I frequently come across articles from the major UK Newspapers, you get a couple of paragraphs and then it is greyed out, with the comment. "If you wish to continue reading you can subscribe to our Rag."

Now, I am interested in reading that Article but not in subscribing to a regular copy of their publication, so I forgo the privilege.

Now, had they offered me a chance to read the item for a small sum, I would happily have clicked PayPal or similar. I don't have time to read a complete copy of the Telegraph or Guardian and no desire to read the Mail, Sun or Express on a regular basis.

Money lost to the industry. What do you reckon?

  oresome 15:02 12 Jan 2019

There is no doubt the newspaper print industry is having a hard time of it.

Few people have time to read in-depth news articles in print and a brief synopsis of the main news events is freely available on-line or broadcast from many media sources and will be more up to date than any printed copy and is perfectly adequate for many.

With declining print sales, getting a revenue stream from on-line editions has been a challenge for the industry and there have been a number of different approaches ranging from total paywalls to restricted articles to voluntary contributions and completely free but dumbing down.

Restrict the readership with a paywall and advertising revenue declines.

I don't know how successful the various revenue models have or are likely to be and I would think it's still in a state of flux. Your idea of paying per article may have some merit but you would be paying for one article unseen which may amount simply be a rehash of something already read elsewhere or simply just be froth with no in-depth journalism.

Perhaps a model where you pay for 24hrs access to the on-line edition when there was something particularly newsworthy happening and had no wish to subscribe on a more permanent basis is worth some consideration.

  Forum Editor 15:17 12 Jan 2019

"...Perhaps a model where you pay for 24hrs access to the on-line edition when there was something particularly newsworthy happening and had no wish to subscribe on a more permanent basis is worth some consideration."

Isn't that a bit like saying you only want to pay for a TV licence when there's a programme you want to watch? Newspapers are fighting to hang on to a share of a rapidly shrinking market.

More and more people are getting their news online or on Radio or TV, and it's a miracle how some newspapers are still going.

  wee eddie 15:25 12 Jan 2019

Well, they have told us that they are losing money by the shedload.

Perhaps it's time to try a different model

  Quickbeam 15:39 12 Jan 2019

The TV licence is a legal requirement to watch TV, even if you genuinely never watch or read any BBC output online.

Subscription channels charge you to watch, but only get viewers that are willing to pay for their output. I'm on free view so don't pay for any TV channels, but have more than enough choice to keep me content.

Mobile phone companies used to be like those models, but now you can have pay as you go, pay for unlimited content or limited access and have it carry over to the next charging period.

This is the model that the papers should look to. There must be a huge numbers of population that will only ever pay for casual access.

There are no papers that I would be willing to pay a full access subscription to. But would be willing to have temporary access to an interesting link such as the one Simon Jary posted on my sentencing post. But I would never fully subscribe to the Torygraph.

  Menzie 15:52 12 Jan 2019

Print in general is dying, and we have a generation where many no longer enjoy the printed word.

Podcasts, audiobooks and videos seem to be the primary way to acquire information now.

I read some publications online who write quite long articles or features and many times in the comments someone writes 'TLDR' which means Too Long Didn't Read.

I've come across some publications who give a taste and hide the rest behind a paywall. Usually this results in me finding another source.

  Quickbeam 15:54 12 Jan 2019

It does actually say on that telegraph link 1 free premium article per week with registration.

But registering with many online sites is also a turn off to me!

  Flat Earther 16:57 12 Jan 2019

The Telegraph does offer 24 hour access for £1 as an alternative to subscription.

  Quickbeam 17:04 12 Jan 2019

I wouldn't pay a £1 to read 1 article from a link as part of someone's posting.

  oresome 17:27 12 Jan 2019

"...Perhaps a model where you pay for 24hrs access to the on-line edition when there was something particularly newsworthy happening and had no wish to subscribe on a more permanent basis is worth some consideration."

Isn't that a bit like saying you only want to pay for a TV licence when there's a programme you want to watch?

Your only commitment with a printed copy is the one you purchase that day.

  Quickbeam 18:07 12 Jan 2019

oresome

I can't believe that we missed the obvious!

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